Checking In: Thankful Thoughts Week 5

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The last few weeks have been filled with nerve pain, rice packs, my heating pad, and cheesy TV shows. I went to my nurse practitioner yesterday and she started me on a steroid and a muscle relaxer to help with the pain. I haven’t had much energy to write, so for now, a short entry will have to do.

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When I am in pain, I try to focus even more on the goodness in my life. If I don’t spend time doing that, things are much more difficult. So here’s my gratitude list for 2015 thus far:

  • I am grateful for sunshine. Even on the coldest days, I can open my blinds and enjoy the beauty of bright days.
  • I am grateful for rice packs and heating pads. I don’t want to consider how I’d feel without those things.
  • I am grateful for decaf coffee. I can usually drink it, even if I’m a bit shaky. And it brings so much happiness to my day.
  • I am grateful for essential oils, especially OnGuard and Oregano. I am convinced that I would have caught a yucky cold if I hadn’t been vigilant about using them during the holidays.
  • I am grateful that I am home. Yes, I am in pain. And it’s no fun. But I am at home, with my husband, my cats, and heated blankets, not in a hospital. And I cannot take that for granted.

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No matter what you’re dealing with today, please look for the little blessings in your life. I promise it will give you a fresh perspective!

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A Letter to the Newly Diagnosed

1419458420891Below is a letter written for people newly diagnosed with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). It’s also a great tool for loved ones who are interested in understanding life with an illness.

Hello,

I know that things are scary right now. It is life-changing to be diagnosed with a chronic illness, and it takes a while to process the news. To be honest with you, I am still learning to accept my diagnosis. But there is always hope, and there is goodness to be found in even our darkest times.

My goal in writing this letter is to share what I’ve learned with you. I am not a medical expert, so please consult with your medical team before making any changes to your treatment. I am dividing up this letter by topic to make it easier to read in case you have “brain fog” or trouble concentrating.

My story: POTS can be triggered by a trauma or illness. I got the flu in January 2014. After that, I never really got better. I was able to return to work from mid-January til March (with a lot of sick days), but things got pretty bad for me. I worked at a residential treatment center for teenagers with mental illness. Most of the nursing staff could tell I was not myself. I lost 10 pounds in about a month, I was always exhausted, I had memory issues, my cognition/decision-making skills were impaired (“brain fog”), and I was very irritable. I craved salty foods all the time. I was also sick with one cold or another that whole time. One night, I was working, and I made a simple mistake that was out of character for me. My co-workers made me take a break. Once I got alone in a conference room, I started sobbing. I just broke down crying. I was overwhelmed and felt awful. I let my supervisor know that I couldn’t stay for the rest of my shift. She’s an RN, and she knew I was unwell, so she graciously let me go home. I was never able to return to work. It has been heart-wrenching for me. Weeks of sick leave turned into months, and then my short term disability was over. I was “let go” due to benefits running out. If I am well enough to work in the next few months, they said they would be willing to hire me back. Right now, I just don’t think that’s realistic for me.
I was (mostly) bed-bound for a few months. I was exhausted all the time and I could barely keep my eyes open. I couldn’t have very long conversations because I would run out of breath and experience chest pain when I spoke. All I was able to do was watch TV, eat, and sleep. I struggled to shower because standing and lifting my hands above my head was painful. I used an ice pack on my chest, but I couldn’t get the pain to go away. I didn’t know that a high heart rate was causing the chest pain because my doctors never looked closely at that part of my vitals. Once they saw my heart was anatomically healthy, they dismissed my chest pain.
I was informally diagnosed with POTS in April 2014. Before that, I had a terrible ER visit. I’ll spare you the details, but I was dismissed as overly anxious and I felt belittled by the staff that treated me. Thankfully, my nurse practitioner saw was determined to help. I went through a battery of tests, which took a good amount of time. I had a sleep study and a narcolepsy test done to see if I had a sleep disorder, but nothing but insomnia was found. I had a few chest x-rays, blood work, and more EKGs done. Finally she did a “poor man’s tilt table test” out of desperation. She took my vitals laying down for 3 minutes, then sitting for 3 minutes, then standing for 3 min. My heart rate went from 95 sitting to 150 standing, and my blood pressure was low. She referred me to a neurologist and he did a normal tilt table test to confirm the POTS. I became tachycardic very quickly after being moved upright. I actually had to end the test early because I was afraid I’d pass out.  My neurologist also did an MRI of my head/spine and I had an event monitor for 30 days.
Doctors and communication: When my symptoms began, I had a family doctor who didn’t believe that I had anything unusual going on.  I’d dealt with fatigue and anemia for years, but she just didn’t believe that a healthy-looking 20-something could be ill. I was shuffled around her practice, from doctor to doctor, since she was rarely available. I decided I needed to see someone else. I talked to a few friends about their doctors, and I started going to a local nurse practitioner.
It’s really important to find a medical provider that you trust. My NP has never doubted that I know my body better than anyone else. She listens to me and takes me seriously. She saw my rapid decline first-hand and she trusts that I will be honest with her. Before I visit with any medical professional, I make a list of my most troubling symptoms and my top concerns. I take the list with me since I tend to easily forget things. I have found that the more specific I can be, the better. I try to specify when certain symptoms began, if there’s anything that triggers them, the intensity, etc. I also keep a log of my blood pressure, temperature, heart rate, and what I was doing before I taking my vitals. At first, I took a reading every day. I varied the time of day and activity so that my doctors would have some variety. Now I take a reading every few days, or whenever I am symptomatic. I record all of it on a sheet in a binder.
After a few terrible Urgent Care and ER visits, I have developed a system. I have “Medical Preferences and History” document saved on my computer that has all of my basic information to give to medical staff in case of emergency. It makes it much easier to have it on paper so that I don’t have to remember everything in a crisis. I also have an accordion folder that has separate sections for medical records, medical bills, insurance statements, work disability paper work, etc. I take the accordion folder with me to every appointment and I keep my “Medical Preferences” document in the front of the folder. I also have a keep a copy of a “Medical Professionals Guide to POTS” in the folder to give to medical staff unfamiliar with my condition. Here’s the website for helpful handouts:  http://www.potsuk.org/download_pots_leaflets
Sodium and Fluids: I drink about 64oz of Gatorade or Nuun drinks a day, and I also drink about 36-40oz of water. That’s a total of about 100oz/day. I had an app on my phone to track my fluid intake until I got used to it. It’s a lot to drink, and I go to the bathroom a lot. I also take 2-4 Thermotabs a day. They are an over-the-counter sodium/potassium supplement. I order mine online. Taking the Thermotabs helps me get enough sodium without over-salting my food.
Driving: I don’t do a lot of driving these days. For a while, my neurologist limited my driving because I was dealing with feeling lightheaded and dizzy most of the time. I also deal with brain fog, which impairs my ability to make quick decisions. Right now, I drive short distances every once in a while. I make sure to plan ahead and hydrate a lot the day beforehand, and I don’t drive if I feel unsteady. I have to ask for help to get to and from a lot of my appointments. My goal for 2015 is to be able to drive 10-15 minutes on a regular basis.
I hope that I’ve been able to help you as you start the journey of living with POTS. Please let me know if you have any questions about managing this illness. I am always happy to share what I’ve learned to help other people.
Sincerely,
Danielle
(Just another POTS patient)

Being Wounded Healers: Thankful Thoughts- Week 4

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Healing has been on my mind this week. I’ve taken steps to make progress in my POTS treatment, but I’ve been reflecting mostly on emotional healing. Chronic illness wears down my soul, so I make an effort to build myself up as often as I can. Healing is a process, and it looks different for everyone. I have a big need for compassionate, grace-filled relationships because they are where I find the most healing. When I am isolated and alone, I find it much more difficult to face the difficulties that come with emotional healing.

This quote by Buddhist author Pema Chodron best explains the type of relationships I find most helpful in my healing process. These words ring true each time I read them.

Compassion is not a relationship between the healer and the wounded. It’s a relationship between equals. Only when we know our darkness well can we be present in the darkness of others. Compassion becomes real when we recognize our shared humanity.

I am grateful for all kinds of things, but today I am most grateful for the compassionate people in my life who help me heal. You see, I don’t need to be judged or summed up by someone else. I don’t need unsolicited advice or anecdotal evidence about why I should change. I suspect that you don’t need those things either. In fact, I am confident that you need compassion from wounded healers just as much as I do. We all need someone to come alongside us, someone who is willing to listen and relate. 

My goal is to be a wounded healer– a person who acknowledges my own brokenness (past and present), who is willing to help other people along the way. For me, that means being a part of a community of women with chronic illness who are committed to encouraging one another. It means reaching out to people who are courageous enough to admit they need support as they face mental health issues. Most importantly, it means that I relate to the hurt and struggle of people around me. I try my best to respectfully help them in whatever way they need, and I don’t spend my time judging them. Being a wounded healer doesn’t mean that I don’t have boundaries, but it does mean that I focus more on kindness than I do on judgement.

So here’s a short list of the compassionate acts I’ve seen around me this week. They’ve encouraged me to keep working toward my own healing.

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  • Lottie Ryan’s festive style challenge brightened up my week. Dozens of chronically ill women from all over the globe took part in the 7 day event. We read uplifting posts that were related to each “style of the day”. The picture above is from first day, “Banish the Blues.” I wore my favorite blue earrings and a blue striped top. I also took time to be close to my cats in order to lift my mood. Throughout the week, I enjoyed feeling put-together even though I didn’t leave the house much. It boosted my confidence to wear “real clothes” every day.

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  • S and I see a lot of poverty in our community and we do our best to come alongside our neighbors. There is a lot of hardship here and change comes very slowly. This week, we got some much-needed good news! It was officially announced that grant money has been secured to demolish 140 structures in our town. After demolition, the property ownership will be transferred to non-profit community organizations. This process will make our town safer and even more beautiful! Plus, local non-profits will be able to take care of the properties and use them to help our community. S and I are excited about this, especially since one of the homes is less than a block away from us.
  • Ashlie has reached out to me time and time again to walk with me through my healing process. She openly shares her experiences with dysautonomia in an effort to help me live a fuller, healthier life. She’s found a way to help other people with chronic illness, and I truly respect her for that. I received my Physician’s Kit and Wholesale membership last Saturday, and I am grateful for her willingness to share her journey with me. I have seen some great results by using my oils this week 🙂 Using the OnGuard essential oil has helped me fight off flu germs, which is a big deal for me these days!

I hope that we can all take time this week to consider how we can be wounded healers to the people in or lives.

Upcoming Dysautonomia Webinar

Dear readers,

I have a form of dysautonomia called Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS). I’ve benefited greatly from medication and physical therapy, but I am always looking for more ways to help myself manage my illness.  I first met Ashlie through her blog when I won a contest. I received a 5mL bottle of Wild Orange essential oil and Ashlie sent me a few other samples for managing POTS symptoms. Ashlie also has dysautonomia and she’s spent time learning which oils help her most. Thanks to her, I found oils to help with my abdominal pain, nerve pain, and anxiety. You can read more about how I use essential oils here. Or you can comment with questions for me. I’d be happy to share what I’ve learned with you.

On December 16, Ashlie is leading a webinar about managing dysautomia symptoms. I’ll be attending, and I want to share the opportunity! I encourage you to consider learning from Ashlie. She has a heart of gold, and she truly wants to help people live healthier lives. Click the link below to read more about the webinar.

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4742231396781907202

To learn more about doTerra essential oils, click here or attend the webinar on December 16!

Love,

Danielle

Do Something Good

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My heart breaks every time I learn about injustice. I am a deeply empathetic person– it’s just the way I am wired. I can see that people all over the country are experiencing pain and feeling misunderstood. There is a lot of hurt these days, and it seems to keep spreading. As I’ve watched the news this week, I’ve felt moved to make a difference, so I’ve been thinking about what I can do to bring positive change in my community. I’ll have to be creative, since my illness causes me to spend a lot of time at home, but I am determined to bring a bit of light into the darkness we face.

I don’t understand why people think that hostility and hatred will bring change. It won’t bring understanding or grace; all it can bring is more hurt. When I watch the news and listen to the people around me, I don’t think we need any more pain. We need kindness, we need forgiveness, and we need to feel heard. We need to know we’re not alone, even when things get messy. Deep down, we have a lot in common.

I know that injustice, racism, and inequality are complex issues, and I still have a lot of learning to do. In the meantime, I’d like to offer a few ideas for bringing hope into our communities.

  • Focus on listening to others. Instead of spending your time thinking about the “perfect response” during a conversation, listen to the other person. You’ll be surprised what you learn when you take the time to focus on someone else’s need to be heard.
  • Look for volunteer opportunities. If you want to make a difference in your community, you may need to do some groundwork. Most charities and community organizations are stretched pretty thin, so they don’t have a lot of time for recruitment. If you care about people experiencing poverty, look into the food pantries in your area. Consider donating food to them every month or set up a time to talk with the director about helping distribute food. If you want to help children, see if there is a chapter of Big Brothers Big Sisters nearby. You need to add your volunteer work to your schedule so that it becomes a part of your life. Otherwise, it’s easy to put it off.
  • Get to know your neighbors. These days, we often connect online, and we sometimes forget about the people who live next door. It can be a bit awkward to say hello to someone for the first time, but most people will say hello in return. Think about baking some Christmas cookies as a friendly gesture– it’s a great way to break the ice. This time of year can be tough, so think about ways to be kind to the people who live nearby.
  • Collect items for a worthy cause. Hygiene items are in high demand for people with little or no income. Consider collecting toiletries from friends and family to donate to a local charity. Or put together baskets of feminine care products, hair brushes, lotion, hair spray, etc. for a domestic violence shelter. Socks are also a much-needed item at shelters. Ask loved ones to give a pack of new socks with your holiday gift and then bring the collection to local homeless shelter. You can also call specific organizations to see what they need most so that your collection can be especially helpful.

I encourage you to set aside time this week to do something positive for someone else.

Be the change you wish to see in the world. -Gandhi

Thankful Thoughts, Week 3

We just finished up the Thanksgiving season in the US. I had a memorable, wonderful Thanksgiving! I hope you did too. I firmly believe that gratitude is important to practice year-round, and I encourage you to take some time to make a gratitude list of your own. There is no “wrong” way to make a list of what you are thankful for in your life, simply out some paper and start writing.

I’ve made some great memories this week with family members, and I am thankful for the moments that make my life beautiful. Here is my gratitude list:

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  • My husband’s family made a 4 hour drive to celebrate Thanksgiving with us in Indiana. They came full of joy and energy, ready to help in an way they could. I directed some of the preparation, but other people made the meal. I was able to listen to my body and rest when needed (which is difficult for me, especially when I am hosting people in my home). We played a game of Farkle, ate lots of pie, and had a great time!
  • I saw my nurse practitioner on Friday because I was having terrible pain on my right side. She was able to fit me in quickly and she even stayed late to help me. I am grateful that she believes I know my body best and that she trusts me to be honest. My neck, back, arm and leg alternated between being painful and numb, which had never happened to me before. I was somewhat scared because it was so unrelated to my typical symptoms. My NP found that I have a pinched nerve, likely due to muscle strain in physical therapy. It should heal in the next few days, but right now I am focused on taking pain relief medication and resting. I am glad that I was able to get an answer before the weekend, because it would have been much more difficult to deal with the pain without guidance from my NP.

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  • My sister-in-law, her husband, and my nephew came to visit us during their Thanksgiving travels. I adore my nephew, but I haven’t been able to see him much because he lives in Illinois, and I can’t travel that far right now. S and I got him a small gift, and we had so much fun opening it with him! My pain and POTS symptoms were manageable during the visit, and I was tremendously grateful.

In this holiday season, I encourage you to take a moment to reflect on the joy in your life. I recognize that there are troublesome things happening everywhere, but I think the best way to face them is to look for goodness.

I have new ideas that I’ll be bringing to the blog later this week, so stay tuned! And please let me know about the goodness in your life 🙂

Quiet Strength

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My favorite television shows include passionate, strong female characters. I enjoy watching the shows because they convey that women can accomplish pretty much anything. And I love that. Oftentimes, the characters barrel into a room during a crisis and boldly tell other people why their cause is important. These women solve problems with their strong convictions and unwavering determination. When I watch these shows, I imagine myself as one of the heroines. I want to solve injustices as quickly as these women, even though I know most problems worth solving take much more than just a passionate speech.

For years, I wished to become someone I would consider courageous. I wanted to be able to convey my convictions by using my words. I hoped that I could get respect by following the formula for strength that I’d seen in television shows. But over the past few weeks, I’ve had a revelation: There is more than one way to be strong, and words alone rarely solve problems. True character is built when we choose goodness over and over again. I do not stride into rooms full of people ready to share my life-changing agenda. But I do have a different kind of strength.

My strength is not particularly bold, and it may not be noticed by the casual observer. But it is still there. Try as I might, I am incapable of looking intimidating–I am just too friendly. However, I have the quiet strength that comes from choosing hope, even when things look beyond repair. I know how to sit next to a friend in tears, understanding that my presence means more any platitudes I could recite. I can bake cookies with trembling hands because I want to show a loved one that I am grateful for their presence in my life. I understand how to listen to a long-winded stranger share his opinions because I know what it is like to need someone to hear me. I have walked through dark places and I’ve made it into the light. These are the things that make me strong. These are the things that allow me to live with happiness, even while dealing with chronic illness.

I don’t think we celebrate quiet strength enough. It is tough to consistently choose love over fear, and it takes strength to live with compassion. I am guilty of not recognizing the courage it takes to live with grace and kindness, but I want to change that. Quiet strength often goes unnoticed because it becomes deeply ingrained into a person’s character– it is part of them. Still, we need to acknowledge those people in our lives who show quiet strength.  They deserve to be celebrated. It is just as noteworthy to make daily sacrifices out of love as it is to show one large act of bravery.

Today, I choose to embrace my quiet strength, and I encourage you to do the same. I let go of the idea that power and strength are the same. I remind myself that I do not need to make powerful speeches in order to change the world around me. I choose to show love. I look for hope when things seem grim. And I am grateful for the women who have shown me the power of quiet strength, because they have impacted my life more than the heroines on television.

Beauty in the Ordinary, Thankful Thoughts– Week 2

This past week has been full of beautiful moments. My illness has cooperated with my plans more than usual, so I’ve been able to do more outside of the house. I’ve gotten to spend time with dear friends, and it’s been glorious. Practicing gratitude helps me remember that sacred moments happen as we go through the motions of “normal” living. There are not trumpets that start playing right before a precious memory is formed and there aren’t announcers to let us know that something special is coming. We have to look for those moments ourselves, and the more we look for them, the more beauty we see.

There is a quote I’ve been ruminating over this past week. It’s one of my favorite reminders to look for goodness all around me, even in the ordinary moments.

The ordinary acts we practice every day at home are of more importance to the soul than their simplicity might suggest. -Thomas Moore

Our routines and chores can be looked at a few different ways. They can be seen as necessary tasks that must be completed before “more meaningful” things can be done, or we can look for the goodness in time we spend doing them. We can spend that time being grateful for the house we need to clean and the clothing that needs to be washed. I’ve seen what life can be like for people who are in need of clothing and housing, and it is tough to go without. I am not suggesting guilt-tripping ourselves when we become bored doing a task for the hundredth time, but I am encouraging us all to look for opportunities to be grateful in the little moments. Because there is meaning in folding laundry for family members, in making the bed, and in doing the dishes. And there is beauty in all of the little moments that add together to make a life. We do not need to look for grand, perfect moments because there is so much goodness in the imperfect, small ones.

Here are a few of the things I am thankful for this week. I hope you take the time to reflect on the goodness that can be found in the ordinary parts of life.

  • I went to the annual Christmas parade for my city last night. It was cold, so I bundled up in my transport chair and drank hot chocolate with friends as we watched our neighbors kick off the holiday season. I enjoyed seeing children wave from their floats with smiles on their faces. I looked around and saw dozens of people around me supporting the good things that happen in our city, despite the cold weather, and it was wonderful.

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  • My husband went out and bought a new cabinet for the upstairs bathroom, and our sweet cat Lily Rose watched him put it together. She spent at least an hour watching his every move and “supervising” him while I laid on the floor because of a POTS flare. Lily Rose has a pretty short attention span, so it was surprising to see her so invested in building a cabinet. The cat was adorable, and even from the floor, I was proud of me kind husband who works hard to make our home even better.

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  • I have a wonderful friend who has visited me at home when I have not been well enough to go out. This week, we were able to go out to coffee at Starbucks! It was so much fun for both of us. I took a picture of myself (above) before leaving to document the occasion.

Please take some time today to consider the beauty and goodness that can be found in the ordinary parts of your life. There is always something to be grateful for in our lives, even in the tough moments.

Self-Care and Chronic Illness

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Today I want to share some tools for bringing joy into your life. We all need encouragement, and sometimes it can be best to seek it out for ourselves instead of waiting for it to somehow come along. I call the practice of encouraging ourselves “self-care.”

Chronic illness can be lonesome and I believe self-care can help make things more bearable. It’s something that we can do for ourselves, which increases feelings of independence. Self-care can benefit anyone, though. I’ve shared my thoughts on self-care with dozens of people. It’s something that helps me, and I naturally want others to benefit from it too. Some people are resistant to my suggestion, so I came up with an analogy to explain why it is such an important tool. Here’s what I tell them:

Self-care is like car maintenance. It isn’t always convenient, but things will break down if you don’t practice it.

Self-care looks different for everyone. It may take the form of quiet, alone time for one person. Someone else may need to call a few friends and share the events of the week. Another person may want to spend time being creative in order to recharge. There is no wrong way to practice self-care. The goal of self-care is to give your soul a chance to be encouraged and refreshed. It is an important part of being an emotionally healthy person and it encourages us to treat ourselves with the same love that we show to others.

I’d like to share some of my favorite ways to practice self-care. I recommend setting aside time for self-care on a regular basis or working it into your schedule until it becomes a habit.

  • I check out daily online readings from people who inspire me. I look at the posts by Brave Girls Club when I need a pick-me-up. Lottie Ryan’s website reminds me that I am not defined by my illness.  And I love Lottie’s weekly e-mails! I read Ann Voskamp’s A Holy Experience when I need spiritual encouragement, as well as the lovely Savannah’s entries at One Mountain at a Time.
  • Janie Hubble and Misty Rees are two of the most brave, beautiful women I know. Their hearts are made of gold, and they truly care about the people around them. They founded Rooted Souls Retreat Center earlier this year.  It’s a place that encourages creativity and restoration. I encourage you to check out their website to see the retreats and workshops they offer.  You will love your time there!
  • Some books are good for the soul. Right now, I am finishing the audiobook The Gifts of Imperfection by Brene Brown. I feel like I get sage advice each time I listen. Anne Lamott’s writing is also encouraging and joyful. It’s written from an honest place and I appreciate the vulnerability she puts into her books.
  • Pinterest is a great place to find encouraging quotes and free printable art. I find words of truth to be one of the most powerful tools I can use to encourage myself. (If you’d like to follow my boards on Pinterest, here’s the link.)
  • My gratitude journal helps me keep perspective. I list at least five things that brought me joy and I reflect on the good things in my life.  I write in the journal every few days. Try it for a few weeks and see the difference that it make!

I hope that you will consider practicing self-care. It’s a tool that can be taken with you anywhere and it’s such an important part of living an abundant life.

Please let me know how self-care helps you in the comments section!

Thankful Thoughts– Week 1

I’ve been taking a class entitled “The Science of Happiness” through EdX.org. It has been a great experience for me, since I can learn from home at no cost. EdX’s goal is to make high-quality education accessible to everyone. There are a variety of courses that can be audited for free, and schools like Harvard University, Berkeley, and Dartmouth provide them. “The Science of Happiness” course focuses on how psychology, biology, and social factors affect the ability to be happy. I enjoy the video lectures the most because I can listen to them, even on days when reading is impossible due to brain fog. Each week there is a suggested practice for increasing happiness, and this week’s practice is gratitude.

I believe gratitude is an important habit, and it has truly made a difference in my life. It has been great for me to learn some of the scientific reasons that gratitude improves quality of life. I am starting a recurring feature on the blog that focuses on the goodness I’ve experienced during the past week. Practicing gratitude is a simple, effective way to improve happiness, and the best way I can show that to readers is to model that on this blog.

So here’s to Week 1 of my Thankful Thoughts feature:

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  •  Physical touch can be a powerful healing tool. On days when I am feeling low, our cat Cali always comes to snuggle with me. She did that a few times this week, and it was wonderful! The isolation that comes with chronic illness is a real issue, but she makes such a difference with her warm presence.
  • Some family friends went on a trip to Germany for a few weeks, and they returned this weekend. S and I went over for dinner last night and got to hear all about their travels. I’ve never been to Germany, so it was quite interesting to me. Plus, sharing a meal with kind people is always good for the soul.

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  • I practiced self-care this week and it made a real difference for me. I drank coffee almost every day, just because I felt well enough to have it! I’ve been keeping my nails painted, which makes me feel more put-together. Right now I’m wearing Plum’s the Word from Sally Hansen. It’s perfect for Fall.
  • I reached out to a friend after feeling beaten-down by a tough week. She made time to come over and just listen to me. Sometimes we all need to be reminded that we are not alone and that love always comes, even in hard times. I also read a great blog post called One Brave Way to Heal Our Relationships, Our Hearts & the Internet. It was just what my heart needed.

I hope that you are able to practice gratitude today, wherever you are. Spending time writing down and acknowledging the goodness in our lives really does make an impact in how we see the world.

For more information about the benefits of practicing gratitude, click here.